Microsoft Makes The Surface Pro Perfect

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In a latest development, Microsoft’s update to the popular and admittedly excellent Surface Pro 4 is called, simply, the Surface Pro. There is no Pro 5.
It’s so similar that one can rely primarily on touch to tell the difference. There’s the slight curve along the previously flat, magnesium shell’s outer edge, the slightly narrowed ventilation channel and there’s the place where the palms rest, on the new Alcantera Type Cover Surface. It feels warm and comfortable, like the surface of a thin sweater, and offers just the tinniest bit of cushion without any added friction as my hands slide over it.
Microsoft’s update to the popular and admittedly excellent Surface Pro 4 is called, simply, the Surface Pro. There is no Pro 5. There may never be one, but the Surface Pro is in no way divergent from the path set forth by the Surface Pro 3 and 4 before it.
There’s the slight curve along the previously flat, magnesium shell’s outer edge, the slightly narrowed ventilation channel and there’s the place where my palms rest, on the new Alcantera Type Cover Surface. It feels warm and comfortable, like the surface of a thin sweater, and offers just the tinniest bit of cushion without any added friction as my hands slide over it.
Moreover, it attaches with a satisfying magnetic snap to the Type Cover, an ultra-thin full-sized keyboard and screen cover that also includes an expansive touchpad and backlit keys.

Technically one don’t have to buy the keyboard — it’s a $129.99 option sold separately from the $799 base system. To have the full Surface Pro experience and to gain the benefit of ultra-light portable with laptop power, Windows 10 productivity and all-day battery life, it is necessary to have the keyboard. The third component, also not included, is the Surface Pen. Microsoft originally built the Surface as a Windows 8 touch device. The multi-touch soul remains, but, over the years, it’s been augmented by Bluetooth pen and digital ink input.
Recent Windows 10 updates have put Ink, Microsoft’s digital writing and drawing platform, at the center. For the new Surface Pro, Microsoft updated the Pen to recognize tilt (the angle at which it touches the screen) and to address up to 4,096 levels of pressure (it was previously 1,024). It also added pen-specific hardware to the tablet screen to communicate directly with the Surface Pen, cutting latency down to 20 milliseconds

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